Tag Archives: woodland

It is winter – īpipohk

I did this video for my Facebook page last year. It came with no translation, but I decided to include it this year. The original comments show varying interpretations and they sound better than mine.

aski māna mithonākwan kā pipohk
kōna māna mithonākoso
īthikohk māna īwāpiskāk aski
āskō māna macikīsikāw
kā tōsāmi mispok, īyati āthimahk pimohtīhowin
nanisīhkāc kāpahkisihk kōna, kwayask mithonākoso
ikwānoma kwayask kitāti māmispok
nākatāpimisok nitōtīmak

The earth looks nice when it is winter
The snow looks beautiful
The earth is so white
Sometimes, the weather is bad
When it snows too much, travel is difficult
When the snow falls gently, it is very beautiful
Now it is going to start snowing more

Take care of yourselves, my friends

 

New Years Day in Woodland Cree

I overheard this term when I was a little from both my maternal and paternal grandparents (literally ‘kissing day’).

Happy New Years from First Nation Stories! I appreciate all the support from the fine people that visit this website, and Facebook Page ⇒ 

Boxing Day – mītawīwikīsikāw

Boxing Day – mītawīwikīsikāw

I got this from the Gift of Language and Culture website – http://giftoflanguageandculture.ca/glcp/calenderfla.htm

“A day for fun and games”

For many of us up North, we usually go sliding on Christmas Day, but Boxing Day is just as good as any.

Happy Holidays everyone!

 

mitho-makosīkīsikanisik – Have a Good Christmas


 

To two or more people

mitho-makosīkīsikanisik

To one person

mitho-makosīkīsikanisi


 

This post was inspired by Solomon Ratt

Plains Cree – Y dialect  by Simon Bird on the #CreeSimonSays YouTube channel

 

First Christmas in our New House – Hall Lake 1982

When my parents got the house in Hall Lake, we got our first family Christmas tree ourselves. We made our own decorations. My mother looked stressed out at the time because it was the first house that our family ever had. Until then, we had been living at my maternal grandparent’s house until I was about 8 years old. We lived in a cabin at Pesiw Lake but this was the first time we had a real house.

My mom – nimāmā, wanted to get to get a tree for Christmas like we did at my grandmother and grandfathers house. My dad – nipāpā, had been out line-cutting and would not be back until after Christmas. It was up to my mom to get the tree.

We got our tree but, we did not have many decorations. My mom received some leftover décor from my grandparents, so she cut up some of them and taped the golden strips onto our angel, which was just a cardboard cutout. She made the angel look beautiful. She was happy to see our delighted expressions as she held it up.

My siblings and I joined in to make a chain out of coloured construction paper and made ornaments out of paper cutouts. We did have tinsel and that added a sparkling look to our dismally bald tree.

nimāmā always did the best she could for us. She knew we were used to the big Christmas feasts we had at 101 Reserve and she tried her best to bring cheer to us. We were seemingly isolated from all the family we knew, and she had to do what she could.

The Christmas presents were already purchased while we were in La Ronge at kōmpanihk – The Bay. They were wrapped and not too well hidden. I tried peeking at what was inside them, but I couldn’t do it without ripping the paper. I tried telling by the weight of the present and by the feel of it. I couldn’t even guess what it was.

On a side note, I posted a question on what “kōmpanihk” means on La Ronge Cree Language Group and my friend James Eninew gave me the answer. It means “At the company” in Creenglish (Cree and English mixed together). Thank you James. 

 

nikāwiy – my mother

nimāmā – my mother (the way most of us say it in La Ronge)

nohtāwiy – my father

nipāpā – my father (the way most of us say it in La Ronge)

mistik – tree

mistikwak – trees

 

La Ronge Cree Language Group – Facebook Group

 

Inanimate Colours in Woodland Cree

Inanimate, describing the colour of a non-living thing. For example: The book is blue – masinahikan sīpihkwāw or sīpihkwāw masinahikan

For Animate Colours go here ⇒


black – kaskitīwāw


blue – sīpihkwāw


brown – wīskwastīwinākwan


green – askihtakwāw


grey – wāpitīwinākwan/kaskāpahtīwinākwan


orange – atōspīwinākwan


pink – wāpikwanīwinākwan


purple – sīpihkomiskwāw


red – mithkwāw / miskwāw


white – wāpiskāw


yellow – osāwāw


 

 

Animate Colours in Woodland Cree

Animate, describing the colour of a living thing. For example: The wolf is white – mahihkan wāpiskisiw or wāpiskisiw mahihkan 

For Inanimate Colours go here ⇒


black – kaskitīsiw


blue – sīpihkosiw


brown – wīskwastīwinākosiw


green – askihtakosiw


grey – wāpitīwinākosiw / kaskāpahtīwinākosiw


orange – atōspīwinākosiw


pink – wāpikwanīwinākosīw


purple – sīpihkomiskosiw


red – mithkosiw / miskosiw


white – wāpiskisiw


yellow – osāwisiw


 

 

November 2019 – Most successful Month of all time for First Nation Stories

November 2019, is the most most successful month for this website. A total of 3457 views and 2018 visitors altogether.

Click to see larger image

 

The year 2019, saw 23, 256 views and 14, 206 visitors. More than tripling 2018, in both views and visitors.

stats
Click to see larger image

Many countries have visited my website. The list is impressive but I am sure that many hits are by accident, especially from the countries overseas.

Click to see larger image

 

My Facebook likes have climbed from 100 in November 2018, to 1800 in November 2019. The First Nation Stories Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/firstnationstories/)

It has been a great year for the First Nation Stories brand and I hope it continues for the New Year!

 

From the words of Cree Teacher, Simon Bird – kinanāskomitin = I thank you/I am thankful for you/I am grateful for you (#CreeSimonSays).

Nouns in Woodland Cree

These are nouns I have seen listed in Cree class at Sally Ross School, where I teach grade 5/6.

iskwīw – woman

nāpīw – man

iskwīsis – girl

nāpīsis – boy

pōsīs – cat

pōsīsis – kitten

atim – dog

acimosis – puppy

iswahtīm – door

wāsīnamān – window

mīcisowināhtik – table

tihtapiwin – chair

othākanis – cup

mohkomān – knife

cīstahasīpon – fork

imihkwānis – spoon

othākan – plate

masinahikan – book

masinahikanāhkcikos – pencil

 

Image source – PIXABAY , just enter into the search box and you can get FREE images.

Sally Ross School – http://llribedu.ca/sally-ross-school/