Tag Archives: cree audio

My Online Cree Sources – Facebook Pages and Websites

I refer to many sources for my website. Without these sources I would be spending enormous amounts of time to complete my blogs about Cree. As a semi-fluent speaker, writer and reader of Woodland Cree, the following sources are invaluable to me.

Facebook pages I follow:

Nêhiyawêwin (Cree) Word/Phrase of the Day – https://www.facebook.com/groups/18414147673/


#CreeSimonSays – https://www.facebook.com/groups/380099328844547/


Cree Language Videos – https://www.facebook.com/groups/100216916980387/


Spoken Cree Video Group – https://www.facebook.com/groups/Creevideos/


Cree Language Resources ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐍᐏᐣ – https://www.facebook.com/groups/104500159643897/


LLRIB Cree Language Resources – https://www.facebook.com/llribcreelanguage/


Websites I have used:

Cree Literacy Network – https://creeliteracy.org/

I have used this website from time to time to see what many prominent Cree teachers are up to. There are too many people to mention, and I do not want to leave anybody out. Check it out yourself for the video, audio and text.


itwêwina – A dictionary that understands what you’re looking for. – http://sapir.artsrn.ualberta.ca/itwewina/eng/crk/

I came across this website last year when I was looking for sources with many variations of Cree words in the linguistics column after a search. I use it extensively.


Online Cree Dictionary – http://www.creedictionary.com/

I think the title of this website, speaks for itself.


Welcome to the Plains Cree Dictionary! – https://dictionary.plainscree.atlas-ling.ca/#/help

I only started using this website today for a project I am working on. It is bit different, but it looks and works very well.


The Gift of Language and Culture website – http://giftoflanguageandculture.ca/glcp/index.html

This website is one I built using Adobe Flash with the help of many great people in the Lac La Ronge Indian Band. Unfortunately, the Flash app is pretty much obsolete. It still works on desktop computers but it will be discontinued in 2020 by Adobe (The demise of Flash –  https://sdtimes.com/webdev/the-demise-of-flash/).


The websites below are from a Google search, maybe you will find them useful in your quest to learn our beautiful language.

How to speak Cree – https://www.canadiangeographic.ca/article/how-speak-cree


Vocabulary in Native American Languages: Cree Words – http://www.native-languages.org/cree_words.htm


Cree Language Lessons – http://nisto.com/cree/lesson/


Please feel free to share your sources as well, whether it’s a book, Elders or other online sources.


Cree language – nīhithawīwin

 

 

November 2019 – Most successful Month of all time for First Nation Stories

November 2019, is the most most successful month for this website. A total of 3457 views and 2018 visitors altogether.

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The year 2019, saw 23, 256 views and 14, 206 visitors. More than tripling 2018, in both views and visitors.

stats
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Many countries have visited my website. The list is impressive but I am sure that many hits are by accident, especially from the countries overseas.

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My Facebook likes have climbed from 100 in November 2018, to 1800 in November 2019. The First Nation Stories Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/firstnationstories/)

It has been a great year for the First Nation Stories brand and I hope it continues for the New Year!

 

From the words of Cree Teacher, Simon Bird – kinanāskomitin = I thank you/I am thankful for you/I am grateful for you (#CreeSimonSays).

Nouns in Woodland Cree

These are nouns I have seen listed in Cree class at Sally Ross School, where I teach grade 5/6.

iskwīw – woman

nāpīw – man

iskwīsis – girl

nāpīsis – boy

pōsīs – cat

pōsīsis – kitten

atim – dog

acimosis – puppy

iswahtīm – door

wāsīnamān – window

mīcisowināhtik – table

tihtapiwin – chair

othākanis – cup

mohkomān – knife

cīstahasīpon – fork

imihkwānis – spoon

othākan – plate

masinahikan – book

masinahikanāhkcikos – pencil

 

Image source – PIXABAY , just enter into the search box and you can get FREE images.

Sally Ross School – http://llribedu.ca/sally-ross-school/ 

ī – miskwamīwik mīskanaw – The road is icy.

Past my vehicle, the driveway looks very dangerous,  I just have to be careful.

ī – miskwamīwik mīskanaw – The road is icy.

aswīthihta īkā kita sōskopathīyin miskwamīhk – Be careful not to slip on the ice.

 

Source – http://sapir.artsrn.ualberta.ca/itwewina/ 

I slipped on the icy driveway – ī – sōskopathiyān ita kā miskwamīwik mīskanās

I slipped under my vehicle today, hurt my shins, but it’s all good.

ī – sōskopathiyān ita kā miskwamīwik mīskanās – I slipped on the icy driveway (small road/trail)

Source – http://sapir.artsrn.ualberta.ca/itwewina/ 

 

tihkisiw kōna – The snow is melting

I stepped out and took this picture of my backyard.

tihkisiw kōna / kōna  tihkisiw – The snow is melting

ī – namihtāt atim – a dog has left tracks

nōkwan thīkaw – the sand is showing

 

Source – http://sapir.artsrn.ualberta.ca/itwewina/ 

Blurb about my Storytelling and nimosōm – My Grandfather

nimosōm – my grandfather used to tell me so many stories about people that lived here or near here. He was a great storyteller and may have taken many liberties with the details. I loved to hear those stories and made my imagination very active with thought and wonder. I give credit to those stories to the storytelling I do with this website, passing on a tradition in a modern way. I also used to tell stories to my children off the top of my head, just to entertain them. I have forgotten more stories than I have on this website.

I remember one story about Hall Lake, where he told me that when he arrived on the lake from a portage, he heard a moose splashing around the shore of the lake. He went further and heard another moose going into the lake in another part of the lake. He heard one more near the mouth of one of the rivers, we have two but he didn’t say which one. I could not imagine that happening in this day and age, nor the time he was telling me the story because there were already many houses and people on the reserve. By the way, Hall Lake in Cree, is mōso-sākahikanisīsihk, according to my late grandfather.

Hall Lake – mōso-sākahikanisīsihk

nimosōm  – my grandfather

 

 

 

 

Thank you for reading my stories

Since November of 2018, views and visitors have gone way up for my website. It all started with stories about nimosōm – my grandfather.

Please visit us on Facebook –

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First Nations Unity Day 2019

Cree audio after the image.

To remember those who fought and those who fell
Kita kiskisīyāhk aniki kākī nōtinikīcik ikwa aniki kākī pahkisīkwāw

 

Pixabay – https://pixabay.com/photos/poppies-field-yorkshire-sun-rays-4291704/