Tag Archives: aboriginal women

My Online Cree Sources – Facebook Pages and Websites

I refer to many sources for my website. Without these sources I would be spending enormous amounts of time to complete my blogs about Cree. As a semi-fluent speaker, writer and reader of Woodland Cree, the following sources are invaluable to me.

Facebook pages I follow:

Nêhiyawêwin (Cree) Word/Phrase of the Day – https://www.facebook.com/groups/18414147673/


#CreeSimonSays – https://www.facebook.com/groups/380099328844547/


Cree Language Videos – https://www.facebook.com/groups/100216916980387/


Spoken Cree Video Group – https://www.facebook.com/groups/Creevideos/


Cree Language Resources ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐍᐏᐣ – https://www.facebook.com/groups/104500159643897/


LLRIB Cree Language Resources – https://www.facebook.com/llribcreelanguage/


Websites I have used:

Cree Literacy Network – https://creeliteracy.org/

I have used this website from time to time to see what many prominent Cree teachers are up to. There are too many people to mention, and I do not want to leave anybody out. Check it out yourself for the video, audio and text.


itwêwina – A dictionary that understands what you’re looking for. – http://sapir.artsrn.ualberta.ca/itwewina/eng/crk/

I came across this website last year when I was looking for sources with many variations of Cree words in the linguistics column after a search. I use it extensively.


Online Cree Dictionary – http://www.creedictionary.com/

I think the title of this website, speaks for itself.


Welcome to the Plains Cree Dictionary! – https://dictionary.plainscree.atlas-ling.ca/#/help

I only started using this website today for a project I am working on. It is bit different, but it looks and works very well.


The Gift of Language and Culture website – http://giftoflanguageandculture.ca/glcp/index.html

This website is one I built using Adobe Flash with the help of many great people in the Lac La Ronge Indian Band. Unfortunately, the Flash app is pretty much obsolete. It still works on desktop computers but it will be discontinued in 2020 by Adobe (The demise of Flash –  https://sdtimes.com/webdev/the-demise-of-flash/).


The websites below are from a Google search, maybe you will find them useful in your quest to learn our beautiful language.

How to speak Cree – https://www.canadiangeographic.ca/article/how-speak-cree


Vocabulary in Native American Languages: Cree Words – http://www.native-languages.org/cree_words.htm


Cree Language Lessons – http://nisto.com/cree/lesson/


Please feel free to share your sources as well, whether it’s a book, Elders or other online sources.


Cree language – nīhithawīwin

 

 

Happy Charles – “our daughter is still missing”

I came across a post by Carson Poitras on Facebook, where he is updating the public that his daughter, Happy Charles, was not found, as was rumoured.

Yes, our daughter is still missing. There was a rumour out there that she was found. This is NOT TRUE. We are still…

Posted by Carson Poitras on Tuesday, November 12, 2019

 

I did not get to know Happy Charles when she was living in La Ronge. I had heard of her from time to time, but I met her only a handful of times.

She seemed pretty normal to me as she chatted with one of my friends, whom I cannot remember, and then she went on her way. I must have been in my early 20s. Happy and I, may be close to the same age, I am 45 tears old right now.

I actually thought they would have located her not long after she went missing. I personally thought she was visiting a remote reserve and staying with friends. I did not think it would become over two years since she went missing.

 

Global News – https://globalnews.ca/tag/happy-charles/

CTV – https://saskatoon.ctvnews.ca/man-seen-in-surveillance-photos-not-a-suspect-in-happy-charles-disappearance-police-1.4671153

CBC – https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/family-happy-charles-calls-provincial-office-families-missing-people-1.5132162

Eaglefeathernews – https://www.eaglefeathernews.com/missing/red-dress-form-a-way-to-fundraise-for-families-of-mmip

 

Nōhkom and my Computer Occupation

My grandmother and her chapan, my daughter Caitlyn

When I started working with the Gift of Language and Culture in 2005, I moved into my maternal grandmother’s house in La Ronge, SK. Her name was Evelyn Venne, ōhōsis was her nickname, meaning little owl in Cree. She was happy to have me live there because I was her favourite grandson (according to me).

She asked me if I was still in school: “kīyāpic cī ī-tāyamihcikīn?” (Are you still going to school?)

I told her no, and that I started working in La Ronge. “tānsi māka īsi ī-ātoskīn?” (What are you working as?)

PC belonging to my daughter (nitānis)

I was anticipating that question way before the conversation, “Web Developer kīsi ātoskiyān,” I said. The look on her face was one of confusion. I did not expect her to understand in anyway and wondered how I could put it in a way she would comprehend. Out of nowhere, she said: “mamahtāwi-āpacihcikan?” (computer).

īhī, (yes) I said, ikotowa kīkway. She looked and smiled her beautiful smile because she knew she caught me off-guard. Lesson learned, just because a person is elderly, does not mean they are not paying attention to the changing world. She knew I was in a computer training program, so I guess she just put two and two together.

She used to enjoy looking at all the pictures I had in my computer and was always amazed at the things it was capable of. I would scan old pictures and she would ask me: “tamahkapihtayin” – make the image larger.

How would one say Web Developer? Kohkominahkīsīs iyāpiy kā osihtāt – one who makes spider web, haha, maybe not. It would likely be a reference to using a computer for work, I think. Something like, mamahtāwi-āpacihcikan katoskātahk – one who works with computers. I believe it would be the general term for maybe IT admin or computer support worker.

Maybe one of the readers of this blog has an idea, I would love to hear it. Any words having to do with computers or maybe mobile devices, would great.

Nōhkom – my grandmother

mamahtāwi-āpacihcikan – computer (astonishing/amazing device)

ōhōsis – little owl

kīsi atoskīyān – is how I work/make a living

īhī – yes

ikotowa kīkway – that kind of thing

tamahkapihtayin” – make the image larger.

Kohkominahkīsīs iyāpiy kā osihtāt – one who makes spider web

mamahtāwi-āpacihcikan kā toskātahk – one who works with computers

Thank you for visiting, I hope to include more about my late grandmother as I go along.

 

I completed a class today: THE PRINCIPLES OF INDIAN LAW

justice-nativeIn one of my classes at Nortep/Norpac, we have been learning about Indigenous Law and it mainly deals with understanding the concepts of Aboriginal law. It’s a vibrant class with much discussion on current events and the impact on Aboriginals and mainstream society.

We were asked to do a case commentary on Metis or Tsilhqot’in cases from 2014. I chose to do Tsilhqot’in Nation v. British Columbia because many of the students had already chosen the Metis decision.

A few weeks earlier, I watched several videos of the case and viewed mainly interviews of First Nations people and how pleased and excited they were over the victory in the Supreme Court of Canada. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4D85H7lQxE

http://warriorpublications.wordpress.com/2014/06/26/tsilhqotin-granted-b-c-title-claim-in-supreme-court-ruling/

The Tsilhqot’in Nation have title on 1750 square KM of land west of Williams Lake. Good stuff.

I learned many important facts in this class pertaining to Aboriginal law. Studying for the final exam gave me much insight on the issues we face as First Nations people and other aboriginal groups. I enjoyed the many subjects in this class and they provide relevance to many of my other classes.

Here is an example of what was expected on our final exam (I do not provide my answers here):

Chapter 5: Crown Obligations

The Honour of the Crown – 3 distinct branches of Crown obligations: Treaty Obligations, Fiduciary Duty and Duty to Consult

Chapter 7: Metis Rights

The Court identified three broad factors: self-identification, ancestral connection to the historic Métis community, and community acceptance.

The difference between Metis Rights and Treaty Rights

Chapter 8: Federalism/Constitutional Issues

The Implications of the Division of Powers on Aboriginal Peoples.

How to amend the constitution

Chapter 9: Aboriginal Women

What are the ways aboriginal women have been discriminated against by the Canadian Government?

Chapter 10: Child Welfare

Contemporary Realities, Best Interest of the Child, Challenges of Aboriginal Control, Customary Child and Family Relations

Chapter 12: Aboriginal People and the Criminal Justice

The Failure of Criminal Law for Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Traditions and Justice, Reforming the Criminal Justice System, Aboriginal Justice Systems, High incarceration rate

All these subjects are very important in our immediate current events of Aboriginal people. I’m glad I decided to go back to classes because I lost sight of many things regarding our struggles as First Nations people.

We need to learn to move on from the past transgressions and thrive as a people once again. Hate and distain from our past wounds only serves to undermine our progress. However, it is important to know what happened to us and what is happening now to assert ourselves and to get on with our lives.

LINKS:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Canadian_Crown_and_Aboriginal_peoples

http://cwrp.ca/provinces-territories/aboriginal

http://www.oci-bec.gc.ca/cnt/rpt/oth-aut/oth-aut20121022info-eng.aspx

http://indigenousfoundations.arts.ubc.ca/home/community-politics/marginalization-of-aboriginal-women.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aboriginal_peoples_in_Canada

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4D85H7lQxE

https://scc-csc.lexum.com/scc-csc/scc-csc/en/item/14246/index.do

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/tsilhqotin-brings-canada-to-the-table/article20521526/

 

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