Category Archives: Cree

Cree language words with translation

Bear and Eagle – maskwa ikwa mikisiw

Molly Ratt – http://firstnationstories.com/?page_id=1733

One wintry autumn day, maskwa was strolling along a path toward his sleeping spot for the winter. As he was a walking, mikisiw was flying overhead to start his trek to the warmth of the south, to the warm rivers, lakes and other areas where game is plentiful during the cold, winter months.
maskwa called out to mikisiw, “tānisi, ikwāni cī sāwanohk iwī ispithayin?” – (Hello, are you flying south for the winter?)

“īhī” – (Yes), said mikisiw, “osām māna kāti akwatihk īkāsocik kinosīwak“– (because when it freezes, the fish are hiding under the ice).

“nīsta ikosi, ikā mīna kīway mīnisa, īyawis ipākihtīki” – “For me too but also because the berries are gone, they have all fallen” maskwa explained.

“mitho nipā maskwa, kihtwam kawāpimitin sīkwahki“ – “Have a good sleep maskwa, see you in the spring.” said mikisiw.

“kīsta” – “You too,” relied maskwa.


Other translations:

maskwa – bear

mikisiw – eagle

mīnis – berry

mīnisa – berries

kinosīw – fish (singular)

kinosīwak – fish (plural)

Directions – These are terms that I heard being said.
North – kīwītinohk

South – sāwanohk

East – sākāstīnohk

West – pahkisimonohk

 

640 LIKES –

Thank you all for your support, I didn’t realize the amount of likes I received from you fine people. I appreciate all the shares and LIKES. It wasn’t too long ago that 400 likes was such a privilege to receive, from such a great group of people. Thank you for following my page.

#CreeSimonSays – Thankful translation.

Background vector created by starline – www.freepik.com – Thumbs up icon use.

FREE PDF Downloads – Plains & Woodland Cree Clock

This past week, there has been a great response to my DIY Cree clock posts. Unfortunately, I posted the images in haste and some mistakes were pointed out but I think I have them all corrected now. I am sorry if this has caused any inconvenience.

For my haste and mistakenly posting the clock images (now updated) , I have posted the following list of all the clocks I have on this website, in Plains & Woodland Cree, already for download in PDF format. Just download and print, easy. I am hoping to complete a Telling Time in Cree lesson next week, so please stay tuned for that.

PLAINS CREE – Y – PDF Downloads ⇓ 

 Y-clock-in-cree_winter_sunset_01

 Y-clock-in-cree_winter_sunrise_01

 Y-clock-in-cree_white_button_01

 Y-clock-in-cree_red_button_01

 Y-clock-in-cree_purple_button_01

 Y-clock-in-cree_green_button_01

 Y-clock-in-cree_fall_sunset_01

 Y-clock-in-cree_blue_button_01

 Y-clock-in-cree_black_01

WOODLAND CREE – TH – PDF Downloads ⇓ 

 TH-clock-in-cree_winter_sunset_01

 TH-clock-in-cree_winter_sunrise_01

 TH-clock-in-cree_white_button_01

 TH-clock-in-cree_red_button_01

 TH-clock-in-cree_purple_button_01

 TH-clock-in-cree_green_button_01

 TH-clock-in-cree_fall_sunset_01

 TH-clock-in-cree_blue_button_01

 TH-clock-in-cree_black_01

I appreciate the great response from my followers. One of my former colleagues, Cynthia Cook, had a novel idea. She wants to download and print one of the clocks I have on this website and fit it into her old clock. I told her, it is a great idea and it would liven up an old boring clock that has been hanging on a wall for years. Why not give that a try.

Because of my mistake, I will have to reprint my clocks but at least the DIY Clock Tools are easy to transfer. Again, I apologize for my haste and hope you will take the time to re-download your favourite design. The previous blog posts will remain the same but the FREE CREE IMAGES page has updated images, check it out.

 

mwākwa – loon – Painting by Allen Morrow

The Cree audio, is based on artwork by Allen Morrow (http://firstnationstories.com/?page_id=787).

mwākwa – loon

mwākwak – loons (plural)

mwākos (or) mwākosis – small/baby loon (I’ve heard both terms).

mwākosisak – small/baby loons (plural)tipiskāwi-pīsim – moon

sākāhikan – lake

wāsakām – shoreline

mistikwak – trees

otākosin – evening (time of day)

 

Many of the words I used are from this page, an excellent resource: http://sapir.artsrn.ualberta.ca/itwewina/

Weather Terms in Woodland Cree (TH)

The following weather terms are in Woodland Cree. The audio clips are much clearer than before.

mispon – it is snowing


You can’t really tell but it is raining in the picture.

kimowan – it is raining


This picture was edited because I have no pictures of when it was hailing.

miskwamiy-pahkisin – it is hailing


kitowak – there is thunder (thunderbirds are calling)


wāsiskotīpatho – lightning storm


kaskawahkamin – it is foggy


Contributed by my cousin, Alice Roberts.

kaskawan – there is fog or mist


thikwaskwan – it is cloudy


wāsīskwan – sky is clear


thōtin – it is windy


tahkāyāw – it is cold


kīsopwīw – it is warm


kisāstīw – it is hot


athwāstin – it is calm


maci-kīsikāw – it is a miserable day



tahkithōwīw – there is wind chill

I took all the pictures shown on this post because I could not find an affordable stock online that I could use. I hope you enjoy this post, it took me a long time to get it done, but here it is.

Thank you for visiting.

Nimosōm Shoots the Rabbit Thief

My grandfather and I used to get up at the crack of dawn and got home at nightfall most days to check our snares and traps. We had been getting some good luck on the rabbit snaring but we noticed our rabbits started to go missing. “awīyak awa ika kimotit ki wāposoma” – Somebody is stealing your rabbits.

As a boy of about 6-7 years of age, it got me thinking of many scenarios of what might be stealing our rabbits, which totally impeded our intake of rabbit soup. I loved dipping my thick crumbly bannock that nimosōm used to make, into the salty, peppery, “pahkwīsikanapoy” – flour soup. What could have been taking our rabbits? I thought maybe an ōhō – owl or mahkīsīs – fox.

I imagined ōhō perched on a branch, looking side by side and then noticing a rabbit, free for the taking. I thought maybe mahkīsīs would be snooping around, stalking its next prey and finding our rabbits, frozen on the ground like they were placed there for them (they kind of were I guess).

I am sure my late grandfather knew what was eating our rabbits, but I had no idea because as young as I was, I didn’t notice the tracks and only listened to the part about “awiyaK” – somebody. It sounded ominous to me at the time because it sounded like it could be anybody or anything that might be deemed evil, like a creature of some kind.

It was late fall, early freeze-up at time and there was not much snow. I remember we may have been walking along the icy shore where it was thick enough to hold us. If we went too far, the ice would start cracking. This was a risk many families had to make to survive. My grandfather had enough experience and knowledge, that we were relatively safe out in the wild.

One morning, when we got to “maskīkohk” – to the muskeg, nimosōm went up ahead to take a piss first but quickly came sneaking back, “awayak awa niwapamaw” – I see somebody. He took his gun that was resting on a tree truck and he loaded it before he went back.

I was completely freaked out, what could he have seen? The look he gave me, was one of excitement when he saw something. I was scared to think of what it might have been. As he loaded up the gun, I went up a bit to see what it was.

I saw some movement where our first snares had been and saw the biggest cat I have ever seen in real life. Having little knowledge of the more diverse animals in the north, I thought it was a cougar. Like the kind I would see on TV in town. This cat looked straight at me for awhile and made a face, I was very amazed and fascinated at the sight of the cat. I stepped back to my original position as nimosōm aimed his gun and shot the “pisiw” – lynx, right between the eyes. The cat dropped instantly, surrounded by rabbit fur and blood. The mystery was solved.

Chances are, my grandfather knew it was a lynx all along, he just wanted to entertain me by sounding frightening in a way. He would have a bit of smile when he mentioned the mysterious thief. It was all in good fun and I fondly remember the many times he told me the tales of wīsahkīcāhk and wihtikō for late evening entertainment. His facial expressions and hand gestures, were gold, in the storytelling process.

Thank you for visiting.

pahkwīsikanapoy – flour soup

maskīk – muskeg

maskīkohk – to the muskeg

ōhō – owl

mahkīsīs – fox

pisiw – lynx

wāpos – rabbit

wīsahkīcāhk

wihtikō

 

Nōhkom and my Computer Occupation

My grandmother and her chapan, my daughter Caitlyn

When I started working with the Gift of Language and Culture in 2005, I moved into my maternal grandmother’s house in La Ronge, SK. Her name was Evelyn Venne, ōhōsis was her nickname, meaning little owl in Cree. She was happy to have me live there because I was her favourite grandson (according to me).

She asked me if I was still in school: “kīyāpic cī ī-tāyamihcikīn?” (Are you still going to school?)

I told her no, and that I started working in La Ronge. “tānsi māka īsi ī-ātoskīn?” (What are you working as?)

PC belonging to my daughter (nitānis)

I was anticipating that question way before the conversation, “Web Developer kīsi ātoskiyān,” I said. The look on her face was one of confusion. I did not expect her to understand in anyway and wondered how I could put it in a way she would comprehend. Out of nowhere, she said: “mamahtāwi-āpacihcikan?” (computer).

īhī, (yes) I said, ikotowa kīkway. She looked and smiled her beautiful smile because she knew she caught me off-guard. Lesson learned, just because a person is elderly, does not mean they are not paying attention to the changing world. She knew I was in a computer training program, so I guess she just put two and two together.

She used to enjoy looking at all the pictures I had in my computer and was always amazed at the things it was capable of. I would scan old pictures and she would ask me: “tamahkapihtayin” – make the image larger.

How would one say Web Developer? Kohkominahkīsīs iyāpiy kā osihtāt – one who makes spider web, haha, maybe not. It would likely be a reference to using a computer for work, I think. Something like, mamahtāwi-āpacihcikan katoskātahk – one who works with computers. I believe it would be the general term for maybe IT admin or computer support worker.

Maybe one of the readers of this blog has an idea, I would love to hear it. Any words having to do with computers or maybe mobile devices, would great.

Nōhkom – my grandmother

mamahtāwi-āpacihcikan – computer (astonishing/amazing device)

ōhōsis – little owl

kīsi atoskīyān – is how I work/make a living

īhī – yes

ikotowa kīkway – that kind of thing

tamahkapihtayin” – make the image larger.

Kohkominahkīsīs iyāpiy kā osihtāt – one who makes spider web

mamahtāwi-āpacihcikan kā toskātahk – one who works with computers

Thank you for visiting, I hope to include more about my late grandmother as I go along.